Allergy Update Photo: Angioedema or Quincke’s Edema

Angioedema or Quincke’s edema is the rapid swelling (edema) of the dermis, subcutaneous tissue,mucosa and submucosal tissues. It is very similar to urticaria, but urticaria, commonly known as hives, occurs in the upper dermis.The term angioneurotic oedema was used for this condition in the belief that there was nervous system involvement, but this is no longer thought to be the case.

Cases where angioedema progresses rapidly should be treated as a medical emergency as airway obstruction and suffocation can occur. Epinephrine may be lifesaving when the cause of angioedema is allergic. In the case of hereditary angioedema, treatment with epinephrine has not been shown to be helpful.

Angioedema is classified as either acquired or hereditary. Acquired angioedema is usually caused by allergy and occurs together with other allergic symptoms and urticaria. It can also happen as a side-effect to certain medications, particularly ACE inhibitors.

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) exists in three forms, all of which are caused by a genetic mutation that is inherited in an autosomal dominant form. They are distinguished by the underlying genetic abnormality. Types I and II are caused by mutations in the SERPING1 gene, which result in either dimished levels of the C1-inhibitor protein (type I HAE) or dysfunctional forms of the same protein (type II HAE). Type III HAE has been linked with mutations in the F12 gene, which encodes the coagulation protein Factor XII. All forms of HAE lead to abnormal activation of the complement system, and all forms can cause swelling elsewhere in the body, such as the digestive tract. If HAE involves the larynx it can cause life-threatening asphyxiation.

Signs and symptoms

The skin of the face, normally around the mouth, and the mucosa of the mouth and/or throat, as well as the tongue, swell up over the period of minutes to several hours. The swelling can also occur elsewhere, typically in the hands. The swelling can be itchy or painful. There may also be slightly decreased sensation in the affected areas due to compression of the nerves. Urticaria (hives) may develop simultaneously.

In severe cases, stridor of the airway occurs, with gasping or wheezy inspiratory breath sounds and decreasing oxygen levels. Tracheal intubation is required in these situations to prevent respiratory arrest and risk of death. Sometimes, there has been recent exposure to an allergen (e.g. peanuts), but more often the cause is either idiopathic (unknown) or only weakly correlated to allergen exposure.

In hereditary angioedema, there is often no direct identifiable cause, although mild trauma, including dental work and other stimuli, can cause attacks.[3] There is usually no associated itch or urticaria, as it is not an allergic response. Patients with HAE can also have recurrent episodes (often called “attacks”) of abdominal pain, usually accompanied by intense vomiting, weakness, and in some cases, watery diarrhea, and an unraised, non-itchy splotchy/swirly rash. These stomach attacks can last anywhere from 1–5 days on average, and can require hospitalization for aggressive pain management and hydration. Abdominal attacks have also been known to cause a significant increase in the patient’s white blood cell count, usually in the vicinity of 13-30,000. As the symptoms begin to diminish, the white count slowly begins to decrease, returning to normal when the attack subsides. As the symptoms and diagnostic tests are almost indistinguishable from an acute abdomen (e.g. perforated appendicitis) it is possible for undiagnosed HAE patients to undergo laparotomy (operations on the abdomen) or laparoscopy (keyhole surgery) that turns out to have been unnecessary.

HAE may also cause swelling in a variety of other locations, most commonly the limbs, genitals, neck, throat and face. The pain associated with these swellings varies from mildly uncomfortable to agonizing pain, depending on its location and severity. Predicting where and when the next episode of edema will occur is impossible. Most patients have an average of one episode per month, but there are also patients who have weekly episodes or only one or two episodes per year. The triggers can vary and include infections, minor injuries, mechanical irritation, operations or stress. In most cases, edema develops over a period of 12–36 hours and then subsides within 2–5 days

Provided by

CHILDREN ALLERGY CLINIC ONLINE

Yudhasmara Foundation htpp://www.allergyclinic.wordpress.com/

Clinical and Editor in Chief : Dr Widodo Judarwanto, pediatrician email:judarwanto@gmail.com, Curiculum Vitae

WORKING TOGETHER FOR STRONGER, SMARTER AND HEALTHIER CHILDREN BY EDUCATION, CLINICAL INTERVENTION, RESEARCH AND INFORMATION NETWORKING. Advancing of the future pediatric and future parenting to optimalized physical, mental and social health and well being for fetal, newborn, infant, children, adolescents and young adult
CLINICAL INTERVENTION AND MEDICAL SERVICES “CHILDREN GRoW UP CLINIC”

PROFESSIONAL CLINIC “CHILDREN GRoW UP CLINIC”

  • Dr Narulita Dewi SpKFR, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Dr Widodo Judarwanto SpA, Pediatrician
  • Fisioterapis
Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a medical or health condition. You should carefully read all product packaging. If you have or suspect you have a medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider.

Copyright © 2012, Children Allergy Clinic Online Information Education Network. All rights reserved

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